Being Hooman


Puppies, kittens and birds have a knack of getting stuck in hard-to reach places. And their cries for help can traumatise those in their vicinity. But sometimes rescuing an animal stuck on the roof or in a tree is not something ordinary people can do. To deal with such challenging animal rescues, a group of volunteers at Charlie’s Animal Rescue Centre (CARE) are being trained in rock climbing so they can scale tall buildings and rescue animals in distress.

Sudha Narayan, founder of CARE in Yelahanka says they receive as many as seven to eight calls to rescue animals every day. Rescued animals, if hurt, are brought to the centre and attended to in treatment rooms. CARE has around 400 animals at the shelter including cats, dogs, pigs, ducks and rabbits. She said, “We have been carrying out rescue operations and treatment of animals since eight years. During the lockdown, there was an increase in abandonment cases, cruelty cases and special rescues.

Two of my team members helped me down 60 feet to the ledge where the kitten was stuck. It was a death trap. If we hadn’t saved the kitten, it would have died there. We managed to rescue it and bring it to the shelter

— Keerthan RP, Manager and Rescue Head at CARE

Many times our volunteers have put their lives at risk to rescue animals. We realised that we need a special force that is trained in tactical skills to handle such rescue operations. We also have another team that handles animal cruelty cases and educates people on how to treat animals, especially streeties. The animal rescue team has been trained in rock climbing and have been doing special rescues for three months now.”



Four volunteers have been trained by Gaurav of Lets Play Climbing. “We’re now planning to train more,” said Narayan.

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Talking about one of their recent special rescues, Keerthan RP, Manager and Rescue Head at CARE said that a three-month-old kitten was stuck in between two buildings of over 60 feet for a week. They got a frantic call from the neighbours in City Market and rushed to the spot. Three of us coordinated the rescue. Two of my team members helped me down 60 feet to the ledge where the kitten was stuck. It was a death trap. If we hadn’t saved the kitten, it would have died there. We managed to rescue it and bring it to the shelter.”

He said that they have also been called to rescue dogs which have fallen into open wells. “In the first week of January, we carried out another operation where a dog was stuck inside a 40 feet-deep well in Bagalur cross for almost 10 days. We rescued the dog and treated it. There have also been cases where people try to pull an animal out of a well by tying a knot around its neck, not realising that they could be choking the animal,” said Keerthan.

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Anirudha, CARE Force Cruelty Inspector said that it is very important to educate people on how to handle the animals. “We receive a lot of calls on abuse and abandonment of animals. People tie their animals and leave them out for days without food to let then starve to death. We teach people to be kind to animals and report abuse when they see it.”



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Sagar Biswas

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